Lateral epicondylitis (more commonly known as tennis elbow) is a degenerative condition of the tendons that attach onto the bony prominence (epicondyle) on the outside (lateral side) of the elbow. The tendons are attached to the muscles that lift (extend) the wrist and hand.

Individuals who develop this condition are usually involved in work or recreational activities that require repetitive and vigorous use of the forearm muscles.

Symptoms may include aching pain on the outside of the elbow or a sharp pain that radiates from the elbow down the forearm. Symptoms are often aggravated by lifting and repetitive forceful gripping.

There are numerous non-operative therapy options which can be used to treat lateral epicondylitis. These include ice, heat, splinting, bracing, massage, ergonomic modification and strengthening programs. Often treatment will involve more than one technique. Your therapist will be able to assess your tennis elbow and let you know which treatments are likely to work best for you.

Medial Epicondylitis (more commonly known as golfers elbow) is much less common than tennis elbow and affects the tendons on the inside of the elbow. The tendons are attached to muscles that drop (flex) the wrist and hand. It is treated in a similar way to tennis elbow.

Tennis Elbow / Golfers Elbow

Lateral epicondylitis (more commonly known as tennis elbow) is a degenerative condition of the tendons that attach onto the bony prominence (epicondyle) on the outside (lateral side) of the elbow. The tendons are attached to the muscles that lift (extend) the wrist and hand.

Individuals who develop this condition are usually involved in work or recreational activities that require repetitive and vigorous use of the forearm muscles.

Symptoms may include aching pain on the outside of the elbow or a sharp pain that radiates from the elbow down the forearm. Symptoms are often aggravated by lifting and repetitive forceful gripping.

There are numerous non-operative therapy options which can be used to treat lateral epicondylitis. These include ice, heat, splinting, bracing, massage, ergonomic modification and strengthening programs. Often treatment will involve more than one technique. Your therapist will be able to assess your tennis elbow and let you know which treatments are likely to work best for you.

Medial Epicondylitis (more commonly known as golfers elbow) is much less common than tennis elbow and affects the tendons on the inside of the elbow. The tendons are attached to muscles that drop (flex) the wrist and hand. It is treated in a similar way to tennis elbow.